Likely in Store
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With This Library Cake, You Can Literally Eat Yourself Some Knowledge

Once again, we find a cake that I love too much to eat. On the other hand, does eating cake versions of books make you smarter? Because that sounds like a learning avenue that we should be exploring.

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Photos of books made by PediaPress with Wikipedia content. By Jann Glasmacher for PediaPress via Wikimedia Commons.

Photos of books made by PediaPress with Wikipedia content. By Jann Glasmacher for PediaPress via Wikimedia Commons.

I can’t believe that I just found out about this service: you can create your own book of Wikipedia articles. After gathering the articles you want to include, you can compile them into a book, and then download it as a PDF, ODF, or even get it printed. I think I just checked a few people off of my  “What the Hell Do I Get Them?” Christmas list.

via the Wikipedia Help:Books page:

Tips for creating great books

Topic and title

There are almost no limits when creating books from Wikipedia content. A good book focuses on a certain topic and covers it as well as possible. A meaningful title helps other users to have the correct expectation regarding the content of a book.

Length

Books should have a reasonable number of articles. One article is not enough, but books that result in PDFs with more than 500 pages are probably too big, and may even cause problems on older computers.

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The post Create your own book of Wikipedia articles appeared first on disinformation.

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And the battle against Amazon rages on…

Amazon.com-Logo.svg

via The Guardian:

Readers of the New York Times will have to steel themselves this weekend, as the unseemly brawl between Hachette and Amazon erupts on to the tranquil pages of the Grey Lady. Perhaps the most incendiary item in Sunday’s edition is due to be a full-page ad paid for by a group of bestselling authors – and backed by over 900 other writers – calling on Amazon “in the strongest possible terms to stop harming the livelihood of the authors on whom it has built its business”.

The extraordinary move is the latest salvo in a battle over terms which has seen Amazon delay delivery and remove the possibility of pre-orders on a swathe of books by Hachette authors, including JK Rowling and James Patterson. The online leviathan Amazon says it is attempting to “lower ebook prices”; publishing conglomerate Hachette argues that it is seeking “terms that value appropriately for the years ahead the author’s unique role in creating books, and the publisher’s role in editing, marketing, and distributing them”.

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The post Authors Place Ads Against Amazon in New York Times appeared first on disinformation.

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Late last night, Amazon unveiled a letter in response to the 900+ authors who have united against the company and its ongoing commercial dispute with publisher Hachette.

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The FCC is slated to close the written comment window for the net neutrality proceeding on September 10th, but that doesn’t mean that the FCC is going to make up its mind anytime soon. In fact, it doesn’t even mean that the FCC will be done hearing from the public. Technically, the public can continue to comment, and the FCC, if it decides to do so, can continue to listen to Americans who speak out against proposed rules that would allow Internet providers to discriminate against how we access parts of the Net.

This is about the future of our Internet. It’s a big deal and the FCC should treat it as such by holding public hearings in geographically diverse locations around the country to hear directly from Americans who will be affected by the Commission’s net neutrality decision.

The FCC has held public hearings before. In 2007, the Commission hosted a series of events, in places like Nashville, Los Angeles, and Tampa, to discuss how new rules about media consolidation would effect the information needs of Americans.  Thousands of individuals spoke out, standing in line to testify in person, share stories, and build a robust public record that undeniably demonstrated the interest of the public. It’s time to do that again.

Filing a comment with the FCC is largely done via webforms on advocacy sites, like EFF’s own DearFCC.org. While online comments are a wonderful way to participate, we believe the Commission would greatly benefit from hosting public meetings to hear directly from the vibrant and richly diverse American public. If anyone can tell the FCC what is right and what is wrong with a potential rule set that would allow Internet providers to offer pay-to-play service for certain websites, it will be the students, entrepreneurs, artists, public safety officials, and everyday people for whom the Internet is a vital tool.

While written comments can be powerful, on an issue as important as this one, the Commission should listen to the voices of people who would stand up at a meeting, tell their stories and share their concerns about the future of the Internet. It’s time for the FCC to put faces to the over one million who have written to the Commission to speak out in defense of a neutral net.

So join us in calling for field hearings after the written comment period closes in September. And don’t forget to take action and get your comments into the FCC before September 10th. Now is the time to speak up. Let’s make sure the FCC listens.

Related Issues: 

Net Neutrality


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via http://ift.tt/eA8V8J Douglas Preston, a Hachette author, wrote a letter to his readers asking them to contact Jeff Bezos. Nearly 1,000 other writers have joined his cause.

via http://ift.tt/eA8V8J St. Mark’s Bookshop, an independent bookstore in New York City’s East Village, recently moved into a new retail location that features a dramatic bookcase that flows around nearly the entire perimeter of the space. New York City-based Clouds Architecture Office created the unusual bookcase design to keep the center of the store uncluttered, allowing the […]

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These Librarian Reviews Of Children's Books Are Awesome

Amid the many hidden treasures in the New York Public Library is a huge collection of hand-typed reviews of children’s books. Librarians wrote the reviews to assess the quality of the book collection—and, since they were exclusively for internal use, their opinions were brutally candid.

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via http://ift.tt/eA8V8J Amazon argues that e-books should be priced at $9.99. But there is a risk that eliminating price experimentation could stifle creative business ideas.

via http://ift.tt/eA8V8J The Onion reports on the new Amazon Kindle Flare, a device that loudly and repeatedly announces the title of books users are reading. Amazon says the Kindle Flare’s repetitive shouting will appeal to fans of print, who miss the ability to display a book’s cover to strangers.

via http://ift.tt/eA8V8J Dan Wagstaff of book blog The Casual Optimist has compiled an extensive collection of book covers featuring books in their designs, or, as he puts it, “books on book covers.” He has divided the covers into sections including “Open Books and Page Turners” and “Cut, Torn, Ripped or Otherwise Defaced or Damaged.” images via The […]

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How to Self-Publish a Book

Twenty years ago, if you were a new author interested in getting your book published, you had to shop it around with publishers and hope that someone, eventually, might not reject you. But nowadays you can choose to self-publish anything you’d like. Here’s how.

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Why Do E-Books Cost What They Do?

E-book pricing can seem mysterious. With some of the costs of paper publishing gone, does that mean that producing them is really cheaper? Or are there other hidden costs that get figured into the production of digital books?

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via http://ift.tt/1nPMD2b Across the US, libraries are setting up maker labs as they turn themselves into hubs for high-tech innovation and trainingimage


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